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4th of July Special Edition

The Taste of Revolution
 

TOPPLING

Our forbears really knew how to celebrate. Upon hearing the Declaration of Independence read aloud for the first time on July 9th in 1776, New Yorkers paraded down Broadway and toppled the gilted lead statue of King George occupying the Bowling Green. After mounting the decapitated “head” to a pike, the celebrants retired to one of the many taverns to raise a pint in toast to the “United States of America”—the name of their new country—heard for the first time that same day. 

Except for beer, our founders would have a hard time recognizing the food and drink we 21st century Americans consume in celebration of Independence Day. If you are looking for a change from hot dogs and potato salad, liven up your Fourth with some authentic 18th century fare.  

UP the Rebels!!! 

Sons & Daughters of Liberty! Give memorable Proof of your patriotism and abstain from the Pernicious Custom of drinking British tea.

A Receipt for a Proper Liberty Tea

 

Blend in equal parts: Lemon Balm, Rose Petals, Lavender Flowers and Crushed Red Root.

Steep a generous pinch in a pint of boilt water. Pour and strain. If you are fortunate, sweeten with a lump of shop sugar and a good measure of rich cream. 

Mom not only brewed the libation, she made the yeast!!!!

Spruce Beer

SPRUCE BEER

 

Take four ounces of hops, let them boil half an hour in one gallon of water, strain the hop water then add sixteen gallons of warm water, two gallons of molasses, eight ounces of essence of spruce, dissolved in one quart of water, put it in a clean cask, then shake it well together, add half a pint of emptins (see below) then let it stand and work one week, if very warm weather less time will do, when it is drawn off to bottle, add one spoonful of molasses to every bottle.

Emptins (yeast):Take a handful of hops and about three quarts of water, let it boil about fifteen minutes, then make a thickening as you do for starch, strain the liquor, when cold put a little emptins to work them, they will keep well cork'd in a bottle five or six weeks.   

Have a little pork in your beef.

Alamode Beef

Take a round of beef; and stuff it with half pound pork, half pound of butter, the soft of half a loaf of wheat bread, boil four eggs very hard, chop them up; add sweet marjoram, sage, parsley, summer savory, and one ounce of cloves pounded, chop them all together, with two eggs very fine, and add a gill of wine, season very high with salt and pepper, cut holes in your beef, to put your stuffing in, then stick whole cloves into the beef, then put it into a two pail pot, with sticks at the bottom, if you wish to have the beef round when done, put it into a cloth and bind it tight with 20 or 30 yards of twine, put it into your pot with two or three quarts of water, and one gill of wine, if the round be large it will take three or four hours to bake it.  

A couple of truly American side dishes.

The American Citron

CITRON

 

Take the rind of a large watermelon not too ripe cut it into small pieces, take two pound of loaf sugar, one pint of water, put it all into a kettle, let it boil gently for four hours, then put it into pots for use.  

A Nice Indian Pudding No. 1

3 pints scalded milk, 7 spoons fine Indian meal (corn meal) stir well together while hot, let stand till cooled; add 7 eggs, half pound raisins, 4 ounces butter, spice and sugar, bake one and half hour.   

Got cow? Then you got dessert!

To make a fine Syllabub from the Cow 

Cow

 

Sweeten a quart of cider with double refined sugar, grate nutmeg into it, then milk your cow into your liquor, when you have thus added what quantity of milk you think proper, pour half a pint or more, in proportion to the quantity of syllabub you make, of the sweetest cream you can get all over it.

Credits:

Liberty Tea recipe written by Christine Blevins (after much and thorough research) 

All other recipes excerpted from the first American cookbook:

AMERICAN COOKERY, OR THE ART OF DRESSING VIANDS, FISH, POULTRY and VEGETABLES, AND THE BEST MODES OF MAKING PASTES, PUFFS, PIES, TARTS, PUDDINGS,  CUSTARDS AND PRESERVES, AND ALL KINDS OF CAKES, FROM THE IMPERIAL PLUMB TO PLAIN CAKE. ADAPTED TO THIS COUNTRY, AND ALL GRADES OF LIFE.  
by Amelia Simmons, an American orphan, 1796  

The first in a Revolutionary War trilogy, Christine Blevins’ novel, THE TORY WIDOW, begins in 1775, when the colonies are on the brink of war, and plenty of rebellion, adventure - and a even little romance - ensues.

 Visit Christine Blevins' website to learn more about THE TORY WIDOW.




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